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2019: Year in Review

2019: Year in Review

The monthly Brooks Applied Labs (BAL) newsletter contained many interesting and informational articles over the past year. To start off 2020, here’s a recap of the most popular newsletter pieces from the past year (click on link for the full article):

Choosing the Appropriate Method for Arsenic Speciation
When routine analytical testing indicates that a sample contains elevated levels of arsenic, more detailed characterization is often warranted. Performing arsenic speciation analysis – where specific molecular forms of arsenic are individually quantified – is often critical; however, if you don’t select the most appropriate analytical method, you can end up without the data you need or paying too much for data that is not helpful. {January 2019}

Selenium and Mercury in Fish Collected Near Power Plants
BAL’s data was featured prominently in this journal article where the authors presented a study of mercury (Hg), methylmercury (MeHg), and selenium (Se) in muscle tissue and otoliths from 12 species of fish collected from locations influenced by power plant wastewater. {August 2019}

Rare Earth Elements 
Rare earth elements (REE) exist “hidden” in water and solid materials all around us. BAL has developed analytical methods to support not just trace, but ultra-trace (ppq-level) quantitation of REEs using column chelation paired with inductively coupled plasma triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (CC-ICP-QQQ-MS). {October 2019}

Congrats Annie Carter on 15-Years with BAL!

Congrats Annie Carter on 15-Years with BAL!

Annie Carter - 15 Year AnniversaryThe Brooks Applied Labs family is excited to celebrate Vice President Annie Carter’s 15-year anniversary with the company! Over the years, Annie has had many different roles at BAL, starting as a sample control specialist and growing to become an exceptional chemist. She was then promoted to group leader, lab manager, and now Vice President. Annie has developed and modified many of the methods used in our Mercury Lab and she has presented at numerous international conferences over the years. Even through the busiest of schedules and the most hectic of weeks, you will never catch Annie walking around the halls without a smile on her face. Congratulations, Annie!

BAL is CGMP Compliant!

BAL is CGMP Compliant!

CGMPBAL is excited to announce that we are now fully CGMP-compliant to current pharmaceutical requirements. The first question you may be asking yourself is what does CGMP compliant mean? It means that our pharmaceutical clients can rely upon Brooks Applied Labs for our technical acumen and quality as well as the documentation and system demands of the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR Parts 210, 211, and 11) and International Council on Harmonization (ICH Q7, Q9), especially as related to our compliance with data integrity requirements. This also means that our clients no longer need different laboratories to support CGMP, R&D, and MS&T facets of their business cycles, which equates to increased efficiencies and standardized high data quality throughout their enterprise. Browse our updated Pharmaceuticals Website for additional information. You can also quickly and easily request a quotation through our website!

Welcome Chuck Bagi!

Welcome Chuck Bagi!

Chuck BagiWe are thrilled to announce that Chuck Bagi has joined Brooks Applied Labs as a Technical Sales Specialist. As a key member of our Business Development team, Chuck is responsible for identifying and capturing new opportunities to collaborate with our pharmaceutical market clients as well as supporting our clients working on Department of Energy sites. He works closely with our business development and project management teams to ensure that the client’s objectives are met and the best possible analytical solution is selected for each project. Chuck is originally from Michigan where he received his BS degree in chemistry from Oakland University in Rochester. In his free time, Chuck enjoys playing guitar and riding motorcycles. Welcome to the Brooks Applied Labs family, Chuck!

Road Warriors, off to Winter Conference!

Road Warriors, off to Winter Conference!

Tucson CactusBrooks Applied Labs is going to the 2020 Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry in Tucson January 13 – 18. Technical Director Hakan Gürleyük and Associate Research Chemist Nausheen Sadiq will be in attendance this year. In addition to the conference presentations, Hakan and Nausheen will attend various short courses at the conference, such as Arsenic and Mercury Speciation in Biological Samples, QQQ ICP-MS, Theory and Practical Use of Reaction Cells and Collision Cells for ICP-MS, and Identification and Correction of Interferences in Practical ICP-MS. Initiatives that support the on-going analytical chemistry education of our scientists, such as attending top-notch technical conferences, is just one way that BAL demonstrates our commitment to our staff and to exceeding our clients’ expectations.

Rare Earth Elements: Not as Rare as You Thought

Rare Earth Elements: Not as Rare as You Thought

Rare EarthWhat are rare earth elements (REE), you might ask? According to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), REEs include the lanthanide series elements plus two bonus elements (yttrium and scandium). Although they are considered rare, REEs exist “hidden” in water and solid materials all around us. Brooks Applied Labs (BAL) has developed analytical methods to support not just trace, but ultra-trace quantitation of REEs using column chelation paired with inductively coupled plasma triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (CC-ICP-QQQ-MS). Partnering with BAL to take advantage of our advanced analytical techniques allows our clients to confidently capture data in parts-per-quadrillion units or pg/L (that’s right, picograms!).

Analytical data for REEs at these low levels supports studies related to environmental forensics, phytotoxicity, change control for chemically defined media, and hydrological movement of contaminants and tracers.

We may not see REEs around us, but they are present in lasers, magnets, capacitors, superconductors, and much more! Although industrial applications for the use of REEs have expanded in the past half a century, regulations have not kept up.  Few, if any, regulations exist associated with REEs. Many studies focused on the uptake and effects of REEs in agricultural crops and other plants have been performed (e.g., Carpenter et al. 2015 and Allison et al. 2015), and these studies have concluded that REEs can have a negative impact on the viability of crops and health of the vegetative ecosystem around us.

Being experts in mass spectrometry provides BAL scientists the tools to develop novel and, most importantly, applicable analytical technologies to support both industrial applications as well as protecting our environment for future generations. Please contact us if you’d like to receive more information regarding the articles referenced above or to discuss how analysis of low-level REEs can support your upcoming projects.